Stay Eat Events Weather Beaches

Oregon Coast Wildlife Officials: Don't Kidnap Wildlife

Published 05/21/22 at 4:45 AM PST
By Oregon Coast Beach Connection staff

Oregon Coast Wildlife Officials: Don't Kidnap Wildlife

Latest Coastal Lodging News Alerts
In Seaside:
Includes exclusive listings; major specials now that winter is here
In Cannon Beach:
Includes rentals not listed anywhere else
In Manzanita, Wheeler, Rockaway Beach:
major specials for winter
In Pacific City, Oceanside:
Winter's enticing specials now
In Lincoln City:
Major winter specials now
In Depoe Bay, Gleneden Beach:
major specials this season
In Newport:
Look for many specials
In Waldport
New amenities offered; specials and tempting prices now
In Yachats, Florence
Big deals available; lodgings not listed anywhere else
Southern Oregon Coast Hotels / Lodgings
Reedsport to Brookings, places to stay; winter deals

(Salem, Oregon) – Whether you're inland in one of the grand wilderness areas of eastern or central Oregon, or in the forests of the Oregon Coast Range or on the beaches, now is the time you'll begin to run into baby wildlife. (Photo courtesy Seaside Aquarium)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) said this week that young animals in the wild are rarely orphaned, so you should leave them alone. If you wind up taking one home in the misguided attempt at a rescue, you will hear the advice of “bring it back,” ODFW said. But you'll also run a great chance of a warning or citation from Oregon State Police.

Picking up a baby animal discovered somewhere in its natural habitat is harmful to the animal and possibly harmful to humans. ODFW said because of this it is Oregon law.

ORS 497.308 states that “No person shall remove from its natural habitat or acquire and hold in captivity any live wildlife in violation of the wildlife laws.”

In spite of these repeated warnings, it occurs over and over.

“Unfortunately, every year around this time, ODFW offices, licensed wildlife rehabilitators, and even Oregon State Police are flooded with calls from people who picked up a deer fawn, elk calf, fledgling bird learning to fly, or other young animal they assumed was orphaned because it was alone,” ODFW said. “When removed from the wild, the animal misses the chance to learn where to seek cover, what to eat and how to escape from predators and other dangers.”

Here's how you can help, however:

Keep pets away from wildlife. Pets cause stress on young wildlife, especially fledgling birds in your own yard. Keep dogs on a leash while outdoors.

If you are certain the animal is orphaned and you saw its parent die, or if it is injured, call ODFW or OSP for advice.

Marine Mammals on the Oregon Coast. These are the most common of these issues for beachgoers, especially young harbor seals found resting on the sand. It's not only the babies, however. Mature seals and sea lions may wander onto a beach to rest. ODFW said to stay clear of them and keep pets away. Marine mammal strandings should be reported to OSP's hotline at 1-800-452-7888.


Elk at Ecola State Park, Cannon Beach (photo Oregon Coast Beach Connection)

Deer and Elk. You may spot these in Oregon coast forests as well. Deer and elk give birth from May through July, ODFW said. Like seals, the mother may stay hidden for an extended period while leaving their young to rest in one spot.

“Never assume a young animal is orphaned when you see it alone,” ODFW said. “The mother will return when it’s safe to do so - when people, pets or predators aren’t around.”

Both deer and elk can respond aggressively to dogs as well.

Oregon Birds. ODFW said some fledgling birds can become separated from their parents while learning to fly. People sometimes see this as an abandoned bird, but again, ODFW said to leave them be.

Baby ducks and geese often become separated from their mothers because of humans in the area. If you spot young waterfowl steer clear of it so it has the best chance of survival.

ODFW stressed that with the appearance of bird flu – avian influenza – it is more important than ever to avoid close contact with waterfowl this spring and summer. Do not feed them, this only causes them to congregate in larger numbers and allows the pathogen to spread to other birds more easily. MORE PHOTOS BELOW

Oregon Coast Hotels in this area - South Coast Hotels - Where to eat - Maps - Virtual Tours


MORE PHOTOS BELOW





Photos below courtesy Seaside Aquarium



More About Oregon Coast hotels, lodging.....

More About Oregon Coast Restaurants, Dining.....


Coastal Spotlight


LATEST Related Oregon Coast Articles

Great Coastal Gale of '07 Tore Into Oregon Coast 15 Years Ago - Video
The storm changed parts of the region forever. History, Bandon, Coos Bay, Newport, Lincoln City, Manzanita, Cannon Beach, Seaside, Astoria
How Storms - Even Solar Storms - May Affect Whales on Oregon / Washington Coast
Why do they disappear? Does it disturb them at all? Marine sciences
Attending Seaside Aquarium This Month Helps Feed the Hungry on Oregon Coast -...
Patrons pay admission to the aquarium with two cans of food per person. Seaside events
Warm Sunsets to Raucous Oregon Coast Storms: Upclose at Cannon Beach's Schoon...
One of the major highlights is that beachfront lawn. Cannon Beach hotels, lodging reviews
Washington Coast Holidays Include Crab Pot Tree, Santa with Pirates, Music, Food
Holiday happs from Ilwaco up through Westport. Washington coast events
Famed Holiday Show Tradition Back on Oregon Coast, at Newport Performing Arts...
The Christmas Show! is finally back, Dec. 16 and 17. Newport events
Cyber Monday for Oregon Coast Too: Giving the Beach for Christmas
Give a night or two at the coast, or books, hoodies, T's. weather
Orcas Spotted Again on N. Oregon Coast - First Time This Pod Recorded Here
A pod of four were photographed on November 23. Marine sciences

Back to Oregon Coast

Contact Advertise on Oregon Coast Beach Connection
All Content, unless otherwise attributed, copyright Oregon Coast Beach Connection. Unauthorized use or publication is not permitted