Stay Eat Events Weather Beaches

Surreal Sights for Oregon Coast, Valleys, Portland: Eclipse, Super Blue Moon

Published 01/27/2018 at 2:15 AM PDT - Updated 01/27/2018 at 1:50 PM PDT
By Oregon Coast Beach Connection staff

Surreal Sights for Oregon Coast, Valleys, Portland: Eclipse, Super Blue Moon

(Oregon Coast) – There will be a triple threat in Oregon's skies on Wednesday. It's the second full moon of the month (called a Blue Moon), it's a super moon – and there will be a total lunar eclipse to wipe it all out of the skies for a time.

Those in Portland, the Oregon coast and in the rest of the state will witness this literally once-in-a-lifetime event, now called a “super blue blood moon.”

Earth's shadow will cover the moon completely, and for 76 minutes the only light you'll see coming off the lunar surface will be the eerie red glow from Earth's sunrise and sunset on different parts of the world.

Latest Coastal Lodging News Alerts
In Seaside:
Includes exclusive listings; heatwave availability
In Cannon Beach:
Who's got rooms open for the heatwave this weekend
In Manzanita, Wheeler, Rockaway Beach:
Room openings this weekend
In Pacific City, Oceanside:
Who has rooms for this weekend hot weather inland
In Lincoln City:
Openings for this weekend to get away from the heat
In Depoe Bay, Gleneden Beach:
Where rooms are to be found this heavy traffic weekend
In Newport:
Room openings, get away from the heatwave
In Waldport
New amenities offered, find openings for the week
In Yachats, Florence
Availability for this weekend; lodgings not listed anywhere else

According to Jim Todd of Portland's OMSI, totality starts at 4:51 a.m. and the point of greatest eclipse will be at 5:29 a.m.

“Astronomical Twilight begins at 5:51 a.m., thus the sky glow emerges above the eastern horizon,” Todd said. “This will diminish some of the redness of the totality on the moon, as well as low above the horizon.”

The eclipse phase of totality will last for 76 minutes, ending at 6:07 a.m., with the partial eclipse phase ending the entire episode at 7:11 a.m. Sunrise kicks in at 7:33 a.m., followed by moonset two minutes later.

Todd noted that you don't need to shield your eyes as with this summer's solar eclipse, and that binoculars or telescopes will enhance the experience.

The other distinctive part is the absolute rarity of this event. The eclipse happens with the moon at perigee – closest to the Earth – called a super moon. It's also the second full moon this month – and the second super moon in January. All this combined with the eclipse is a massive coinciding of events: so rare that it hasn't happened on Earth since December 30, 1982, and that was not even in North America.

“For observers in the Pacific Northwest, it is the first time all three of these phenomena will line up since March 31, 1866,” Todd said.

However, whether or not you can see it is a big question. The forecast for Wednesday morning in the overnight hours is mostly cloudy and at least a 60 percent chance of rain for both Portland and the Oregon coast.

However, NASA TV (NASA.gov/live) will be streaming the eclipse starting at 2:30 a.m. PST, making it a good alternative.

For those in or visiting Portland, you can learn more about the current night sky and the eclipse in Starry Night Live, shown daily at OMSI's Kendall Planetarium.

Along the Oregon coast, there will be plenty of great spots to watch, especially if you can get out on a dark beach or a high viewpoint. Places to check out are those at Manzanita, just south of Cannon Beach, Anderson's Viewpoint near Oceanside, above Newport's Nye Beach, Cape Foulweather near Depoe Bay, or the pulloffs near Cape Perpetua. Where to stay for this event - Where to eat - Map and Virtual Tour

Stay off smaller beaches at night, and stick to wide stretches where there's a few hundred feet between the tideline and the cliffs or vegetation line. The Oregon coast may have a slightly easier time observing the phenomenon as clouds move more quickly and the breaks between them may happen more often.

Todd said the next total lunar eclipse will take place on January 20, 2019 at 9:12 p.m. and promises to be spectacular, as it occurs at night rather than at sunrise.

Oregon Coast Lodging







More About Oregon Coast hotels, lodging.....

More About Oregon Coast Restaurants, Dining.....

 

Oregon Coast event or adventure you can't miss

 



Coastal Spotlight


LATEST Related Oregon Coast Articles

Trippy Sides of Oregon Coast Astronomy This Week: Slower Sunsets, Champagne Moon
The moon and the sunsets are playing some interesting trick. Sciences
Above Portland, Oregon, the Coast: Second Full and Super Moon, Eclipse
The second super and full moon of the month, and total eclipse on Jan 31. Weather.
Biggest Oregon Coast News Stories of 2017: Eclipse, Oddities, Hidden Shipwreck
2017 had its share of wild occurrences, with storms, small quakes, weird nature, and a secret shipwreck. History
Two Supermoons, Blue Moon, Eclipse for Portland, Oregon, Coast
2018 kicks off with an astronomical bang in the skies; some bizarre facts about tides. Sciences, weather
Supermoon Above Portland, Oregon, the Coast Sunday Night
It's not only a full moon but a supermoon, and the first of three supermoons. Sciences
Moon, Planets Put on a Show Above Oregon, the Coast Tonight and This Week
A lot going on in those skies above Portland and the Oregon coast, and this weather will give great glimpses.
Fall Equinox Brings Shorter Days to Oregon Coast, Maybe Moon Display
The autumnal equinox happens this Friday (September 22), right at 1:02 p.m. Science
Eclipse Impressions from Oregon, the Coast in Pics, Video, Words
My first look at the eclipse is indeed a surreal kind of dusk. Weather

Back to Oregon Coast

Contact Advertise on BeachConnection.net
All Content, unless otherwise attributed, copyright BeachConnection.net Unauthorized use or publication is not permitted

Oregon Coast Lodging
Rentals
Specials

Dining

Events Calendar

Oregon Coast Weather

Travel News

Search for Oregon Coast Subjects, Articles

Virtual Tours, Maps
Deep Details